Evil Clown 

On Leap of Faith: "Alien yet familiar, bizarre yet completely fascinating. Expanding, contracting, erupting, settling down, always as one force..." - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG

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Press on Evil Clown: 

An Evil Clown And A Leap Of Faith 
       by Karl Ackermann, AllAboutJazz


"The core collective under Evil Clown is Leap of Faith, which when expanded to the Leap of Faith Orchestra includes players from Metal Chaos Ensemble, String Theory, Turbulence and Mekaniks. The common denominators in these collectives is the presence of PEK in each, and a completely unorthodox approach to creative improvisation. An unfamiliar listener, dropping into an Evil Clown recording may find themselves submerged in world of musical anarchy but there is a hidden order behind the apparent mayhem...."

Evil Clown

Documenting the Music of  Leap of Faith and associated ensembles

Press on Evil Clown: 
Dave Peck: Evil Clowns Records, de l'impro sans concession
       by Claude Loxhay, Jazz Halo - Belgium

"Leap of Faith vient de sortir l'album Field Extensions (Evil Clown 9115), une pièce d'environ une heure qui s'ouvre sur une séquence de flexatone (plaque de métal percutée par des billes) et débouche sur une explosion de sonorités brutes, mélangeant sonorités acoustiques et électriques, dans un véritable magma sonore: une musique improvisée, aléatoire, bruitiste qui est à la musique ce que peut être l'art brut à la peinture traditionnelle...."

Press on Leap of Faith

     and Leap of Faith Orchestra: 

On Potential and Actual Infinities...

"…here, we can hear each member clearly, all three taking their time, slowing down to a simmer with hypnotic, ancient, spiritual jazz like moments. PEK plays a long, haunting bass sax solo, bending and twisting each note carefully. For those of you want to check out the vast ocean of Leap of Faith recordings, this is a perfect place to begin, since we can hear the three core members perfectly as they evolve, take an occasional solo and work well together as one focused force of nature, organic and inspiring.”
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG   "


On Potential and Actual Infinities...

For this performance the Leap of Faith trio of PEK on clarinets, saxophones, double reeds & flutes, Glynis Lomon on cello, aquasonic & voice, and Yuri Zbitnov on drums & percussion was joined by Jim Warshauer (reeds) and Eric Dahlman (trumpet, overtone voice) to perform two improvisations, including a long work featuring transformations across highly varied sonorities."
- Squidco Staff


On Nucleosynthesis...
“…here, we can hear each member clearly, all three taking their time, slowing down to a simmer with hypnotic, ancient, spiritual jazz like moments. PEK plays a long, haunting bass sax solo, bending and twisting each note carefully. For those of you want to check out the vast ocean of Leap of Faith recordings, this is a perfect place to begin, since we can hear the three core members perfectly as they evolve, take an occasional solo and work well together as one focused force of nature, organic and inspiring.”
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On First Principles...
“…Without the drums, things are more sparse, yet still somehow magical, floating through space. The septet is often sparse with the cello & percussion interweaving layers underneath. Eventually different subgroups emerge: amazing interaction between both trumpets, trombone, saxes & cello. Yet another OUTstanding from the super prolific Leap of Faith crowd.”
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Charge-Transfer Complex...
“… The music starts out quietly with restrained but mysterious sounds. This is the most laid back of the Evil Clown catalogue. It sounds quite casual, like a few old friends getting together for a shared meal and conversation. There are some great moments, weird string duets that occur midway, never over-playing but creating a hypnotic trance of sorts…”
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Virtual Particles...

"…The Leap of faith Orchestra, which is only an octet here, is also in fine form and held together by PEK’s timed segments, rarely if ever too chaotic, incredibly focused yet still exuberant and intense in part. The Leap of faith Orchestra seem to be PEK’s most successful ensemble due to the way Mr. Peck has chosen his featured musicians, np matter how many are involved. If you dig cosmic large ensemble music, then this disc is for you!”

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On The Photon Epoch...
"The results are extraordinary!...  The music unfolds slowly and is very restrained in the first section, building in density and intensity as it goes. Although music sounds free, it is rarely too chaotic, there is something holding it together and directing the currents or flow. I have listened to quite a bit of large ensemble music and must admit that this one is one the best. The balance between the free and the directed flow is seamless, organic sounding and even magical at times..."
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On The Photon Epoch...
"In a decade of writing for All About Jazz, Chicago Jazz Magazine, and The New York Jazz Record, I’ve had the opportunity to listen to thousands of creative music recordings, of overwhelming diversity.  I have heard nothing like the music of PEK….  There is a new collective depth to LOFO’s sound; symphonious, and with greater complexity of emotion, but still bristling with an underlying rawness...  The Photon Epoch marks a forward movement in PEK’s music, and it also stands out as the highlight to-date, of one of the most prolific and unique composers of our time."
- Karl Ackermann, All About Jazz


On The Photon Epoch...
"I’ve reviewed 'LOFO' several times now, & each performance is better… one word of advice, however… approach their music with NO preconceived notions… of course, as with all great experimental music, it’s always better to SEE it, so I MOST strongly recommend that you watch the live video first…   personally, I believe there should be some kind of “awards” show for experimental music – & if there was, this trek would win awards HANDS-DOWN..."
- Dick Metcalf, Contemporary Fusion  


On The Photon Epoch...
"The full Boston-area Leap of Faith Orchestra in its largest configuration performing a Frame Notation Score composed by PEK to guide the improvisation, this work based on the The Photon Epoch, a period in the evolution of the early universe, using a vast assemblage of instruments and devices to create a unique narrative in an energetic and wonderfully unpredictable journey."
- Squidco Staff


On Order of Ramifications...
"Starting off quietly, the suspense runs deep. The music here is stripped down so we just hear the two strings and percussion for a while. Ms. Spiers erupts half way through this long set, with quick, intense lines while Pek also unleashes layers of interweaving fragments. Mr. Zbitnov usually plays drums and often keeps the rhythmic flows going, lays back here and plays more minimal cymbals & bells. Ms. Spiers is a gifted violinist and throughout the second half of this long set she is featured at length, taking long & winding solos, with some strong interaction from Ms. Lomon’s equally impressive cello and Zbitnov’s spinning brushwork. ...things are often more minimal and the pace is slower at times. Subtle yet still engaging, nonetheless."  
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery   


On Order of Ramifications...
"The core trio of the Boston collective Leap of Faith Orchestra of improvisers, approaching large work using unique compositional techniques and an arsenal of traditional and unusual instruments and percussive devices, here joined by Elinor Spiers on violin, log drums, glockenspiel, metal, wood, crotales, and cymbells, for a uniquely detailed and immense improvisation.  

- Squidco Staff    


On Tangled Hierarchies...
"...  This quintet version of Leap of Faith is stripped down so that everyone gets a chance to solo and we can hear them all.  Mr. PEK works with one reed or wind instrument at a time, taking a number of spirited solos. What stands out is the cello playing of Ms. Lomon, spiritual piano undertow by Mr. Zinman and percussion/dialogue from Yuri Zbitnov and Syd Smart. More cosmic music from mere mortals?!?"    
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 


On Tangled Hierarchies...
"A 2019 performance in Cambridge, MA of this intertwining quintet of unique instrumentation, with PEK on bamboo & bass saxophones, clarinets, contrabassoon, tarota, melodica, sheng, aquasonic, wood, metal, wind siren, crank siren, & chimes; Glynis Lomon on cello, aquasonic, & chimes; Eric Zinman on piano; Syd Smart on percussion; and Yuri Zbitnov on drums, gong, wood, metal, wind siren, & chimes."    
- Squidco Staff    


On Cosmological Horizons...
"...Cosmological Horizons begins with a gong and mystical chimes. The rest of the band fades in unevenly, as if each section is being jostled out of one private trance and into another, more active communal one. What follows is 85-minutes of controlled chaos. The piece sounds largely free, though its contours are thoughtfully composed. This is apparent not only in the surprisingly tight sectional outbursts, but the numerous instances where the band collectively quiets to make space for brief cello, bass, piano, and other miscellaneous interludes. The percussion adds foundation and texture, with an understated dynamism. The horns are numerous, but they never fall into the free blowing competition that consume so many avant-garde big bands. The strings appear and disappear as if carried by an unsteady breeze. The electronics rarely come to the fore but offer further depth to the otherwise primarily acoustic ensemble. In other words, there is a lot going on. And although the overall effect is compelling enough, repeated listens uncover the mechanics, the discrete explorations of timbre and tone, the interlocking and interdependent musical gears that are turning at each moment. A single, intricate track recorded live at Killian Hall (MIT), this really is an opus, and one well worth checking out. " 
- Nick Ostrum, SquidsEar


On Cosmological Horizons...
"... Unlike earlier Evil Clown discs (which are CD-R’s), this one is a real CD in a lovely digipak with a thick booklet. Most impressive on many levels. As someone who genuinely appreciates large ensemble/big band music, I am awed by how much work Mr. Peck has put into this serious piece. The piece starts off somewhat chaotically, yet somehow there sounds like certain subgroups are being directed. Chattering reeds & horns, seesawing strings, layers of percussion erupting, colliding and interwoven thoughtfully, explosive Cecil Taylor-like piano… Considering how many musicians are involved here (24 by my count), it is amazing at how focused, engaging and thoughtfully balanced this is. .... An outstanding effort on all fronts so grab your copy today."
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 


On Cosmological Horizons...
"...  As he often does, PEK composes a single, extended piece for the duration of the performance; the title track here clocking a bit over seventy-seven minutes. For several years PEK has utilized his Frame Notation technique where the score is seen in written descriptions and archetypal symbols within duration bars. This allows the musicians to immediately sight their cues as well as providing a view of the larger scope of the piece. To see the score laid out in hard-copy form is to witness a cross between visual art, Gantt charts and complex schematics. Somehow, PEK makes it all work cohesively....   ....The construction of PEK's compositions offer few predictable rudiments in the structure of the composition; melodies appear as transitory moments of discovery, barely audible through the collective improvisation. It is experimental, and abstract, and certainly aimed at the open-minded listener."

- Review by Karl Ackermann, AllAboutJazz


On Cosmological Horizons...
"After forty years (+) of reviewing music, both “straight-up” and “out there“, I can truly say that the music from LOFO is different than anything I’ve ever listened to…  …if you claim to be a fan of adventurous improvised music, this album (and their entire series, in fact) MUST be in your collection – it’s some of the best creative energy I’ve ever heard, and that’s saying a lot, because I’ve not only listened to a lot of such, but did (in fact) perform some of my own madness back in the day! ..."
- Dick Metcalf, editor, Contemporary Fusion Reviews 


On Fractured Symmetries...

"...Like most discs by Leap of Faith, this one starts off with ritualistic percussion: gongs, cymbals, bells, drums… one by one, slowly building until other instruments enter… the low-end drone of a double reed… subtle layers of percussion ever-expanding… What makes this session/set different from past Leap of Faith is that it is often laid back… no weird vocals or over the top intensity. It shows another side to this band which is rarely heard..." 

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery      


On Proof Theory
"... Unlike other Leap of faith discs, this one erupts intensely right from the beginning with a dense layer of percussion (gongs, bells & cymbals) plus waterphone(s) and whistles…  There are moments of frenzied activity and moments of calm contemplation and lots of time in between…  Another winner..!"

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery    


On Topological Constructions
“Part of the fun is that there’s a whole lotta doublin’ goin; on. Just look at the Rabelaisian list of instruments the leader wields to suit his constantly morphing purposes, half of which I can’t identify, or the briefer but equally fascinating arsenal of drummer Yuri Zbitnoff. All that timbral merriment foregrounds the fact that performer anonymity is a common occurrence, leaving the listener afloat in a haze of changing style, sound and space. There are certainly times when that legal fiction we still call jazz rears its head, or threatens to do so, but it quickly submerges beneath orchestral shades and crystalline percussion avalanches.”

- by Marc Medwin, Squid's Ear


On Topological Constructions
"... For this disc, the three core Leap of Faith members (Pek, Lomon & Zbitnov) have added two string players…  Both string players sounds great, especially when they are egged on by Ms. Lomon’s spirited cello! One of the things I like about this disc is that it moves slowly and doesn’t have some of the fireworks that some of the larger ensembles have. It is superbly recorded, warm and clean with very little hyper-intensity. Hence, if you are patient, the rewards are great!"
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery    


On Refuting Leplace's Demon...
" ... The Leap of Faith Orchestra continues to grow personnel-wise, adding musicians, known & unknown, from the Boston area whenever they play live…  It is hard to believe that Mr. Peck keeps everyone so focused, with a good deal of well-balanced improv and several subgroups working so well together…  Although there are some chaotic moments, there is a great deal more directed or focused improv connecting everyone in the ensemble. If you live in the Boston area and seek challenging music to check out live, you will have ample opportunity to check Leap of Faith (quartet - orchestra) and their varied sub units..."

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery

- On Gravitation...

"... I like that the quartet takes their time to stretch out on each instrument. Mr. Zinman adds bits of fragmented melodies at times, raising ghosts long buried down below. What amazes me about this disc is that it is often restrained, and sounds like a modern jazz quartet at times. Yes, there are some occasional outburst of weirdness but overall it is a gem of creative music." 

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery


On SuperClusters...
“… Starting with gongs and miscellaneous bangs, cracks and rattles, the one hour and sixteen-minute begins a meander through a busy marketplace of interdependent colors and motions: Some of the big, staccato gestures resemble those from Messiaen's Chronochromie; others bond together in a flexing wall similar to the climax of Cage's Atlas Eclipticalis; when all hit at once near the 4:30 mark, there is a warzone reminiscent of Varèse's Amériques. With a score indicating points of ‘turbulence’ and ‘everyone frenzy,’ cacophony is the best description for this first several minutes and other spots throughout the piece…”
- Dave Madden, The Squid’s Ear


On SuperClusters...
​"...SuperClusters appeals on at least two levels; the technical aspects of PEK's approach are intriguing and thought provoking. From a musical perspective those techniques translate to a listening experience that seems to change with each successive play of the disc..."
- Karl Ackermann, AllAboutJazz.com


On SuperClusters... ​​

"… the composition uses a graphic notation system called Frame Notation, and the music they produce is full of power, as well as lots of 'wide open spaces' – all executed flawlessly...  just superb creative effort that will blow your mind."  
- Dick Metcalf Contemporary Fusion Reviews"


On SuperClusters... ​​
"The 4th work from composer, band-leader and multi-instrumentalist David Peck's Frame Notation Scores for his large ensemble Leap of Faith Orchestra, his graphic notation allowing exceptional, unexpected and truly unusual results in large-scale improvisation, an amazing evolution of the big band concept executed by the some of the finest players in the Boston area; amazing!"
- Squidco Album Blurb


On Vector Space...

"...This set features just the three core members of Leap of Faith with no guests and it is the smallest version of this ever-evolving ensemble whose membership goes from quartets to orchestras. This is also the least amount of instruments that Dave PEK usually brings, just over a dozen. The sound here is more stripped down and takes its time to build into the normal, ritualistic, organic vibe... This disc shows that Leap of Faith actually have a more mellow side at times, strange as it may seem. This is still tasty medicine for those who need that ancient free spirit."

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Vertices...

"...At the beginning we just hear a few players: a reed, brass or two, percussion, cello, slowly whistles, more percussion, more brass, more reeds, the odd vocals, enter, one or two at a time. The piece evolves organically and the balanced, flow and recurring are all high quality. I doubt the Leap of Faith Orchestra will find their way down to NY although we are lucky to have had a smaller (quartet & quintet) version here at DMG twice. Those of you in the Boston area I would advise you to check them out if you can. Elsewhere, you can choose one of many discs to hear them do their thing. Try one, you will most likely be knocked out."

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Domains...  

“… a Leap of Faith recording isn’t so much about the individual voices, but rather, the totality of the improvisation. Veering from bowed to bouncing to bitonal, the basses dominate, and the group weaves their dark magic around them…  With the tilt towards the strings, the set is dominated by the low frequency instruments and features a different level of gravity. Absolutely captivating.”

​- Paul Acquaro, FreeJazzBlog


On Domains...  

"The music remains challenging and intelligent but perhaps more accessible, and it is the best Leap of Faith album to date."
- Karl Ackermann, AllAboutJazz.com


On Domains...

"As with most Leap of Faith discs, things begin quietly with ritualistic solemnity...  All of the members of the quintet get a chance to stretch out at length, taking their time to play longs solos, duos, trio and focused group improvs... Parts of this disc are quite restrained and even calm, something we don’t often associate with Leap of Faith, yet the balance feels just right.  If you don’t already own some discs by Leap of Faith, this is a perfect place to begin." 

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery


On Domains... 
"One of the core ensembles in Boston's Evil Clown collective led by multi-reedist David Peck is Leap of Faith, a uniquely inspired collective free improv band with unusual instruments and percussive devices, here in a live concert at Outpost 186 as quintet with Glynis Lomon on cello, Damon Smith on bass, Silvain Castellano on bass, and Yuri ZBitnov on drums & percussion."
- Squidco Album Blurb


On Differentiations...

"...This version of LoF remind me of a body of water like the ocean, starting off calmly before the waves start crashing. Everyone builds together exchanging ideas, combining forces in different groupings..."
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery


On Dynamical Systems...

"Like their two sets at DMG, Leap of Faith, are an acquired/informed taste. There is sometimes incredible going on here, you just have to unwind and go with the flow...."
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery


On Helix...

“…This is no-holds-barred improvisation in its most challenging, uncompromising form…  there are some hair-raising moments along the way capable of startling and challenging even the most experienced listeners of freely-improvised music.  ‘Helix’ is a striking example of what can be done by larger ensembles within the realm of free improvisation…”  

- Troy Dostert, The Free Jazz Collective


On Possible Universes... 

"…What is even more impressive is that Mr. PEK has learned how to organize/lead this massive ensemble so that it doesn’t sound consistently like chaos. The core members of Leap of Faith, PEK on multi-reeds, Glynis Lomon on cello and Yuri Zbitnov on drums are often at the center with various layers of strings, reeds, brass, guitars, basses and percussion surrounding them….  Everyone takes their time and sounds completely focused. I know that Mr. PEK has been employing a timer or clock to help keeps things more balanced and the results are indeed phenomenal. This could be the best Leap of Faith release so far, which is pretty amazing considering that I’ve reviewed some two dozen plus discs so far. “

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery


On Possible Universes... 

"...The highly capable improvisers engaged by PEK are participating in the composer's unique method of Frame Notation…  Along with strings and three basses, a large assortment of percussion instruments, and two tubas, the orchestra utilizes an assortment of non-conventional devices such as bullroarers, claves, flex-a-tones, slide whistles, wind sirens, crank sirens, bells, Tibetan bowls, ratchets and a tube-o-phone…  Possible Universes works in a surprisingly paradoxical way, allowing structure and freedom to coexist, while constantly challenging the ear. It's not quite like anything else..."

- Karl Ackermann, All About Jazz  


On Possible Universes... 
"...While much can be said about this recording, it’s been a while since I’ve heard an ensemble of this size, with so many players, that were in the zone: the magical zone, where a musician or artist can do no wrong.  I’ve only seen the smaller version of the Leap of Orchestra, but what’s on this CD is pure TNT – nitroglycerin! On this night, the orchestra is playing as one, generating wave after wave of highly energetic polyphonics. It’s so organized even when it’s disorganized within the parameters set by the leader, David Peck. This is the most formidable output I’ve heard from this unit. It is truly remarkable to hear how the musicians are in sync with each other.  Do pick up your copy of Possible Universes pronto at the nearest record store, or order it online. If you haven’t heard any of the previous CDs by the Leap of Orchestra, I highly recommend this recording, as a place to start!" 
- Marc Edwards, Jazz Right Now


On Unbounded Sets... 
“… The music here is free improv, focused and spirited, a fascinating dialogue is taking place and evolving…  There is a good deal of serious listening going on as the quintet display some shrewd, ever-evolving interaction…  Another set of strong musical medicine by the witch-doctors of sonic travel.”
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery

Bruce Lee Gallanter Spoken Introduction to Infinite Perimeters performance

"... In the 1960s there was the Mothers of Invention, in the 70s there was Soft Machine and Henry Cow, in the 80s there was Naked City and in the 90s there was Masada. In the aughts, we have Leap of Faith, who are here with us today... they came down from the Boston area... It's a long trip... this is an underground scene so we're all really lucky to be here hearing the music and hanging out with people who care about the same things we care about..."

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery


On Supernovae...
"Boston area composer and multi-instrumentalist David Peck developed a unique approach to scoring for this large and idiosyncratic ensemble, referred to as Frame Notation, giving descriptions of sonority, time scale, events, playing occurrences, etc, leaving a great deal of freedom for these extraordinary musicians, as borne out in their incredible and extended performance." 
   -  Squidco Newsletter


On Supernovae...

"... the orchestra ... created some highly engaging and unique music, generating layers upon layers of sound and texture. The overall feeling is organic and vital, balancing space and density.  ... It's best to describe this music as an experience, as there is little to suggest what will happen next, and no repeated melodies or extended themes, rather it's a sequence of improvised events that culminate into a greater whole. ... Each visit with the Leap of Faith folks reveals new ideas and revised approaches. Supernovae strikes me as a milestone in PEK's vision and his group's cohesion - less aggressive, more nuanced and spacious. A neat addition to an expanding musical universe." 
   - Paul Acquaro, FreeJazzBlog


On Supernovae...  

"PEK's ensemble—not surprisingly—includes enough non-traditional and weird instruments to compete with a Dr. Seuss orchestra...   As with all of PEK's compositions, there is—behind the scenes—a painstaking amount of organization that is not always evident in the listening. That is part of the beauty of this album; the non-traditional approach to instrumentation and the lack of adherence to Western structure continue to make the various iterations of Leap of Faith consistently interesting." 

   - Karl Ackermann, AllAboutJazz


On Supernovae...

"The first part features an extraordinary percussion section for tympani’s, cymbals and other layers of small percussion. This long work (77 minutes) sounds like it is sectional, with various subgroups emerging and with occasional solos rising above the waves. If I didn’t know better, I would think that this was a Braxton or Globe Unity Orchestra piece, this is how strong and well-balanced it is...  As a longtime fan of large ensembles and orchestras, this is one of the more successful orchestral units I’ve heard in a long while! Long live Leap of Faith and their ever-growing network." 

   - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery  


 On Supernovae... 

"Leap of Faith Orchestra is one of the most ambitious projects within avant-garde jazz, approaching work such as that of Marshall Allen and the Sun Ra Arkestra in range and scope...   There is so much movement happening, the music can only be consumed as a whole, rather than focusing on subsections or individuals...  The music is both free and very structured simultaneously. This piece is less about melody, but meant to be heard, as an experience. This music will take listeners to different places; a mental journey of the imagination, as the music opens the door to other dimensions."  

   - Marc Edwards, JazzRightNow


On Supernovae...
"Composer and instrumentalist PEK (David Peck) has created a big band experience decidedly different from nearly any other. Not for PEK are standard charts with themes and room for soloists; instead an extended (some 77 minutes) ‘composition’ for orchestra is replete with various and sundry unusual instruments and  delineated sections in which a variety of colors and textures take center stage, leaving a listener with the distinct feeling of experiencing something of note....  If these descriptions seem vague and non-defined, be assured that as a full musical experience, there are wonders to be discovered. "  
   - Donald Elfman, New York City Jazz Record


On Unbounded Sets... 

"The first set starts off quietly with Ms. Lomon’s hypnotic bowed cello, subtle percussion, vibes, an organic interweaving of several reeds, double-reeds… This must be the most laid-back of the many sets of Leap of Faith that I’ve caught or reviewed...  ​The three reeds players work well together with their kaleidoscopic, ever shifting blend of various reeds. Consistently engaging yet still holding back and never giving in to unnecessary extremes. This was one of their best sets..."

  - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery


On Centroids...

"​Like many of the Leap of faith sessions, this one begins slowly with a somewhat ritualistic aura. Several clarinets or other reeds, cymbals, assorted metal percussion give this an Art Ensemble of Chicago-like vibe....   While listening to the second half of this hour long disc, the music reminded me of way life is right now: ridiculous, hard-to-believe, explosive, too intense at times with occasional moments of humor or low-key reflection.   Yet another twisted treasure from the deluge of great Leap of Faith discs."

​   - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery


On Pseudorandom Generators...
This quartet version of Leap of Faith is compact: focused and fortified. The interplay the two reedmen is consistently inspired and probing. Somewhere between the Art Ensemble of Chicago (small instruments, whistles & metals) and Euro Free/jazz/improv is what we have here... From somber to stimulating to mind-blowing!
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Emergent Properties
"The guitars slowly weave their sound into controlled chaos which is both intoxicating and somewhat disorienting.  In one segment midway, the cello, double-reed(s) and electronics blend into an intense, hypnotic mirage with a calm center. Much of this long section midway is restrained yet filled with some strange nuanced sounds: drones, hums, bowed strings and percussive fragments... It is another ridiculous high point, certain to make some smile and others perhaps wince. With so many fine discs under their collective belt (more than 100), how do they continue to release such genuine gems?!? The legend of Leap of Faith continues…"

      - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On The Expanding Universe... 

"The sole track (being the title track) is a sprawling epic at seventy-seven minutes and does indeed deviate between the austere and the chaotic, but as always, composer PEK has a higher purpose. Swerving whistles and a siren usher in the piece with no small amount of urgency building to a crescendo of noise before a lone tuba replaces near-calamity with dark mystery. Later, piano and alternate devices struggle for dominance, lopsided melodies collide with bells, blocks and cymbals in a musical representation of the album's stated theme... Like any uncharted exploration, attention to detail makes this experimental journey a memorable experience."  
     - Karl Ackermann, AllAboutJazz

On The Expanding Universe...

"The results are pretty extraordinary. The work is very long, nearly 77 minutes and goes through different sections. The music sounds directed since it moves in precise waves with different subsections rising and falling back into the often turbulent sea of sounds. A number of different things stand out: an intense free piano solo (Peter Cassino), a layer of brass waves sailing with another layer of twisted reeds, sporadic double rhythm teams (tablas?), erupting and then disappearing. The balance of more sparse sections with occasional dense outbursts sounds tightly directed.  Considering that the Evil Clown label which documents all of the Leap of Faith and their offshoot projects, is closing in at nearly a 100 releases, this disc might just be the best one I’ve reviewed. A completely outstanding effort all the way around."
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery

On The Expanding Universe... 

"Free jazz, noise, rock, it’s all here, but mostly free jazz. This might be among the free-est recordings I have ever heard, right up with Arthur Doyle, Albert Ayler, or Henry Cow. There are so many musicians, and so many instruments, that it is difficult to keep track of what’s going on. This is a fantastic, amazing record. I suggest you check out some of their other recordings online. The Expanding Universe is not easy listening, but the patient listener will be rewarded."
     - Eric Baylies, The Noise-Boston  

On The Expanding Universe...  
"...a bracing collage of ever-varying sound color universes and at times they kick up a hell of a fuss! Other times they are a bit more focused within...   But all told you are in for a wildly free trip into the nether worlds of the universe. Nice one!"
     - Grego Applegate Edwards, Gapplegate Muisc Review


On The Expanding Universe...  
"Even with such a large body of mass abstract poly-phonics, there is an order to the chaos within the music…  The music is very out there in every sense of the word…  The lines intersect, as well as go off in divergent directions. There is very unusual counterpoint lines employed throughout this lengthy piece. The drums rumble in the background intensifying the mood. I must add, the drumming was consistently outstanding throughout this hour plus performance…  At the one hour mark, the music gets even more experimental. The orchestra ventures into electronic music in the science fiction sense of the word…  If you’re not familiar with the music of Dave Peck, do pick up a copy of this CD and his many other recordings. I believe he has one of the most adventurous orchestral ensembles in free jazz."
     - Marc Edwards, Jazz Right Now


​On Factorizations...
 "... Alien yet familiar, bizarre yet completely fascinating. Expanding, contracting, erupting, settling down, always as one force..." 
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery

On Factorizations...
"If you're looking for sonic adventure, if you're looking for something you didn't know you needed, and if you think you're ready, then yeah, take the leap of faith. This genuinely nice group of musicians transform into something completely otherworldly as they start digging into the dozens of instruments that festoon the stage." 
     - Paul Acquaro​, freejazzblog

​On Factorizations...
"The out-lining group phrasing is expressively advanced, noisy at times in the best sort of way, and filled with an excellent give-and-take."  
     - Grego Applegate Edwards, gapplegatemusicreview.blogspot 

On Solution Concepts...
​​"Starting out and fits and starts like an extended warm-up, 'Subgame' doesn't take much of its almost forty minutes to be convincingly harrowing. With barely the trace of a melody, the marathon number nevertheless captures some satisfying but inexpressible spirit of wild abandon... 
     ...their output has been prolific and varied. PEK and Lomon have worked in formations from duo to large ensembles. Heberer's presence on Solution Concepts makes it quite different from earlier Leap of Faith albums but true to the experimental vision that PEK and Lomon first realized more than twenty years ago. The music on Solution Concepts is probing, intelligent and—in some instances—poignant." 
     - Karl Ackermann, AllAboutJazz.com

On Solution Concepts...
"The final number is a twenty-minute conflagration of Heberer and Leap of Faith joined together. It gives the entire ensemble space to open up worlds of improv and at the same time gives space as well for Heberer's voice to respond to the others and vice versa. The track has a great deal of strength and shows the complete complement of artists at their best..."
     - Grego Applegate Edwards, gapplegatemusicreview.blogspot 

On Solution Concepts...
"​You can hear that these folks have been playing together for a long while since they have a focused group sound. Everyone in the quartet was integral to the sound and approach of what makes Leap of Faith unique. Each member got their chance to stretch out and shine.  ... One of the things I love about this band is/are the strange vocals which always add a bizarre alien presence that makes them quite unique."      
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Abstract Structures...
"What one comes away from this diverse and intense live set is the bottomless creativity of the musicians. The music is intelligently paced, and the breaks in tone and shifts of approach and sound are appropriately done. This is an excellent outing that should be heard. Recommended."  
     - Stefan Wood, freejazzblog  

On If and Only If...
Volume 1:  "Leap of Faith make each set special by taking their time, listening closely and conversing like friendly spirits. ... Ms. Lomon takes the first unaccompanied cello solo, the forces bristling, before the rest of ensemble erupts. Dave Peck's double reeds, Mr. Norton's sax or clarinets, Ms. Lomon's cello, Mr. Harris' trombone and bother/either drummers interact and erupt at times, crazed spirits being set free. There is the occasional weird vocal bits here and there which are brief and always fit just right. Escapees from a loony bin or just musicians who need to be set free..? ... Can Leap of Faith do it again?!? You bet they can and do!"

Volume 2:  "Slowly the double reeds, clarinets, cello, percussion and occasional weird vocals come in, as the layers expand. Ms. Lomon's odd plucked cello is often at the center as the different drones from the reeds or brass appear, floating in layers.  Less ritualistic, yet just as mesmerizing as these longtime free music specialists combine forces to produce another cosmic brew. I dig that there are a number of more stark and mysterious sections instead some of the over-the-top weirdness that Leap of Faith usually go for."
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery​

On Flow Regimes...
"The music is well-balanced and often sounds directed, organically evolving from section to section. I found this set pretty mesmerizing, never too dense or disturbing. About 51 minutes long and consistently fascinating."   
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On The Fucked Up Circus Comes to Town...
"The music moves from sparse to gnarly to very intense, free yet somehow connected. At times, it sounds like a conversation between aliens or even animals (for the occasional shriek), but it does make sense once you get used to it."   
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Hierarchies...
"Intense, focused and consistently spirited.... Another bizarre and outstanding trip from the unstoppable Leap of Faith."  
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Linear Combinations and Transformations (Original Release)... 
"... intense, focused free improv with a few layers of inter-connected lines. Occasionally sparse but mostly more dense. Everyone involved gets a chance to stretch out and push things into a frenzied dialogue, while these long journeys unfold organically and balance things in well-measured ways..." 
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Linear Combinations and Transformations (Alternate Takes)... 
"Even in their early days, Leap of Faith have worked their way through an organic method of improv which works well no matter who is playing with them, both core members and guests."  
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Out of Zeit...
"... the strings and reeds sound great together, often playing with similar textures and timbral qualities. Of the half dozen Leap of faith discs I've checked ut so far, this in one is the most intense, riveting and the furthest out. Are you ready to be knocked out? Then take this Leap of faith and dive into the unknown...​"  
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Regenerations...
"...high, full-bore free improv spontaneities that pay close attention to timbral sound-color shaping as well as freely expressive collective improvisations. Each shifting grouping of instruments gives rise to color spectrums alternatingly bright or impastoed, clustered or speckled depending on the moment...."  
     - Grego Applegate Edwards, gapplegatemusicreview.blogspot 

On Regenerations...
"Their sound is organic, it grows from within, and there is an arc to the track that belies either an uncanny connection or some pre-planned moves as there is an inherent structure and motion to the sound... The track will go from a reflective passage on a low woodwind to a dense thicket of cello double stops to juxtaposed harmonies, and just as quickly, it may delve into percussive textures and spontaneous intertwining melodies. It's this potent mix of instrumental timbers and unexpected changes that make their music so effective." 
     - Paul Acquaro​, freejazzblog 

 On Superalloys...
"This music is completely improvised and quite free, reminding me of the Art Ensemble of Chicago, in the organic way hat their sets unfolds and are filled with the possessed spirits of various reeds and little instruments like percussive toys or chochkes. This disc is 74+ minutes long and most compelling throughout." 
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

Stu's Leap of Faith Essay...
"The music was startling in the suddenness with which it shattered all that evolving chaos with focussed, clearly articulated beauty..."  
     - Stu Vandermark 

On Hyperbolic Spirals...
"Scrapes and clangs of metal, a hybrid cry of rooster and human, fill the opening sequence to Hyperbolic Spirals Vol 2 with a palpable tension.  The first 20 minutes is all texture and a diffused soundscape. However a culmination of chimes around the 10 minute mark seems to signal a new movement: the mood lightens, the clouds lift, and the pulse quickens. It takes a while for a somewhat anticipated buildup of the wind instruments to occur, but when it does, it's huge. Mixing with the chimes and splashes of sound from the metal, it's really quite moving when it reaches its zenith."  
     - Paul Acquaro, freejazzblog 

On Riemann Surfaces...
"I was at the set in Brooklyn and I recall it very well since it was one of the most intense music experiences I've attended in a long while! This is the regular Leap of Faith quartet with no guests and they are in wonderful form here!  ...Things build here to an intense frenzy which is almost too much at times yet is still transcendent its own weird way. Both of the sets here capture Leap of Faith at their best, focused, spirited and likely to blow your minds inside-out! This is my favorite of the dozen or so discs I've reviewed of their so far!"  
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica...
"The trio set is less busy than the usual quartet or quintet versions. The sound of the two spiraling reeds and cello sound especially great together, bending and twisting their notes in a similar fashion. They sound somewhat relaxed and keep a certain calm, thoughtful vibe at the center. Often one player will start a line and another will complete the line. Hearing PEK by himself is also unusual and revealing as he takes his time and concentrates al length on his alto sax rather than the dozens of reeds he often plays at most Leap of Faith sessions."
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Elliptical Eccentricity...
"There is quite a bit of common ground or at least a bond between Ms. Lomon and Mr. Pek as they often improvise in similar ways, exchanging ideas, completing each other's sentences and sounding like one combined force of nature. Time to check out another chapter of Leap of Faith" 
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

​​Press On Axioms:

On Manifestations...
"Boston's Evil Clown collective led by reedist/multi-instrumentalist David Peck introduces a new ensemble, Axioms, a quartet with Peck, Jane, Alby onBass, and Joel Simches, in a mammoth work of mysterious intent and rich sonorities, orchestrated with reeds, brass, daxophones, percussion, bells and chimes, electric bass, keys, spoken word, and real-time signal processing."   
​    - Squidco website staff for Squidco Blurb  


On Manifestations...
"... features the spoken words of Jane (no last name) and Albey Onbass on bass. Could this be Albey Balgochian and his partner Jane ZenBeatz, both of whom worked with Cecil Taylor? The music here has a mysterious, eerie, drifting vibe with a subtle, selective amount of reverb added like seasoning. PEK takes his time on each instrument, while Albey adds another layer, spinning a web and Jane also takes her time, quietly adding her poetry in soft spurts."        
​    - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 


Press On Metal Chaos Ensemble: 

On Proteus IV...
“… The Boston-are duo of reedist PEK and percussionsit Yuri Zbitnov cover a wide range of sonorities, always with the presence of Gongs, chimes, glockenspiel, Tibetan Bowls and many other metallic sounds and the horns of PEK, here in a sci-fi epic, with Eric Woods on modular synth and Englephone, Mike Gruen on bass, and Joel Simches with real-time signal processing.”
- Squidco Staff


On Reverberatory Furnace...
“… Exploring chaotic rhythms on metallic instruments, the Metal Chaos Ensemble was formed in 2015 by multi-instrumentalist/reedist PEK and percussionist Yuri Zbitnov, using the "Evil Clown Arsenal" of exotic and unusual percussive instruments including gongs, chimes, glockenspiel, Tibetan Bowls and many other metallic sounds, here in an extended set with guest Moouse Traore on Djembe."
- Squidco Staff


On Reverberatory Furnace...
“… Like most discs by LoF or Metal Chaos, this begins quietly, slowly and builds from there. The ever mighty drummer, Yuri Zbitnov, sounds great and is at the center of trio whipping up a rhythmic storm. PEK concentrates on one reed at a time, with inspired solos on bass sax, regular & contralto clarinets, and the other two saxes. Since PEK has fewer reeds to choose from, his solos are longer, giving us time to appreciate each one…  This is one is very organic and flows superbly throughout. 4 & 1/2 stars!”
- Bruce Lee Gallanter


On Basilisk...
“… Like most discs by LoF or Metal Chaos, this begins quietly, slowly and builds from there. The ever mighty drummer, Yuri Zbitnov, sounds great and is at the center of trio whipping up a rhythmic storm. PEK concentrates on one reed at a time, with inspired solos on bass sax, regular & contralto clarinets, and the other two saxes. Since PEK has fewer reeds to choose from, his solos are longer, giving us time to appreciate each one…  This is one is very organic and flows superbly throughout. 4 & 1/2 stars!”
- Bruce Lee Gallanter


On Proteus IV...

“… The core of this group, is reeds, el. bass and drums, which soon gets their stride by getting into a fine funky, spaced-out groove in the first section with swirling electronics and/or effects swirling around the central groove. Mr. Zbitnov’s superb, uplifting drumming is at the center of the great groove, eventually turning into more spaced out weirdness. And there back to another great space/funk groove with some swell blasting sax from our man PEK! In some ways, this disc sounds like in was inspired in part from Gong and Hawkwind. The recitation has an interesting science fiction sort of vibe as well…”

- Bruce Lee Gallanter


On Beyond the Holy Mountain...

“… Starting sparsely at first, with the space trumpet and soft electronics simmering underneath. The music starts to escalate, the electronics kinda like a Gong space jam played in the distance. Building, expanding, the electronics getting more dense, a some tribal-like percussion at the center from the irrepressible Yuri Zbitnov and Albey on el. bass. The analog electronics, laptop and computer gives things a more ancient sound (early seventies). This 70 minute piece evolves like a scientific journey, sailing through the stars, and eventually the somewhat disorienting recitation reappears near the end. From Art Ensemble spirituality to Gong-like space journey, where will the Leap of Faith Offshoot Express end up next?!?”
 - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG            


On Luminiferous Aether...

"About ten minutes in, the musicians hit their groove, as the discrete rumblings well into a whirling psychedelic stew of depth, gravity, and ludicrousness befitting, well, the Luminiferous Ether it seeks to reflect...   Although Luminiferous Ether stands on its own, consider it one more contribution to the Evil Clown collective's catalog, another unique brick in its wall, or maybe more appropriately, one long, colorful strip of fabric in its bizarrely calico circus tent. It glistens and rustles. It is weird. It draws one's ears. And, it is one small but important contribution to the broader evolving, luminiferous whole."  
​    - NIck Ostrum, Squid's Ear 


On Luminiferous Aether...
"Everything is well-recorded, the subtle layers of percussion slowly getting more dense. The sextet mix tribal drumming with eerie synth sounds and spacey cymbals, metal or balafons. Although all of this music is improvised, Mr. Pek always assembles ensembles who listen, react and contribute selectively. Rarely do things get too dense. Mostly, everything flows together organically although, the echo effects also keep the vibe mesmerizing. "  
​    - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG    


On Luminiferous Aether...
"Metal Chaos Ensemble, formed in 2015 as a working project to explore rhythms on metallic instruments guided by rule-based chaotic systems of a very large number of small components, presents a quintet studio recording using three dedicated drummers, reeds, electronics, and accompanying "tape" mixes, resulting in epic, inspired and wonderfully unpredictable improvisation."  
​    - Squidco Staff  


On Syncretic Discipline...
"PEK and Yuri Zbitnov lead the Metal Chaos Ensemble, here in a septet rendering of this Boston-area free improvising group that embraces an impressive arsenal of percussive, electronic and acoustic instruments, using unique strategies to yield densely active and eerily surreal music, an incredible excursion through experimental improvisation."   
​    - Squidco website staff for Squidco Blurb  



On Syncretic Discipline...

"... The first section sounds like a Gong space jam, most eerie and dream-like. Eventually PEK’s mutant contra-alto (?) clarinet floats in, rumbling & squawking softly. The density of the sounds is carefully pulsating, somber throbbing bass at the center until the drums finally hit a great space-rock groove, which builds a bit before settling down to a more restrained section...  The Metal Chaos Ensemble now have more than a dozen discs under their collective belt. Each one is strong in its own way..."   

​    - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG  


On Cryptomorphisms...

"... This set begins quietly with spacey effects simmering underneath, slowly PEK enters on haunting (bass?) clarinet and Yuri on cymbals or metals of some sort. Certain mysterious sounding instruments enter one at a time: space trumpet, quietly disorienting electronics, orchestral bells, haunting sounds often hard to identify. For this session, the MCE are at their most cerebral, spacious and superbly recorded. Like entering a slightly disorienting dream-world." 

    - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG  


On Cryptomorphisms...
"The Boston ensemble of unique instrumentation layering percussion, bowed and struck metal, synth, vibes and other percussive devices, whose core players are drawn from the Leap of Faith ensemble, is joined by Eric Woods on analog synth, along with two guitar players and Joel Simches on real time signal processing, allowing for an expanded palette of sound." 
    - Squidco webite staff 


On Blast Furnace...

“…  The name of the band refers to the fact that all or most members play (metal) percussion at some point. Certain sounds or instruments are difficult to tell apart: guitar or analog synth or both at the beginning of this session? Haunting echoed sounds and soft metal percussion is what we hear in the first section. Like all LoF discs, this is well-recorded and balanced. PEK switches between more than a dozen instruments, mostly reeds, some obscure, some not, often concentrating on one at a time…”   

   - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Grain Boundaries...

“… PEK uses a sampler or synth, to alter the sound of his different reed instruments, creating a haunting web hypnotic sounds. The ritualistic percussion builds and expands, adding selective bits of echoes to enhance the ghost-like percussion sounds. The overall effect of listening to this music is one of mesmerizing, disorienting and enchanting in a weird sort of way.” 
    - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Malleability...
"This is a stripped down version of Leap of Faith with just two members and it is one of the best discs. Superbly recorded at Evil Clown Headquarters, mostly reeds, percussion and minimal electronics.  Unfolding slowly and concentrating on one or two instruments at a time.Rather than go too far out, the duo cautiously weave their sounds with great care. Everything is well-balanced and rarely too dense
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Intermetallic Compounds... 

"A massive and metallic improvisation from the Boston area trio of David Peck, Andria Nicodemou, and Yuri Zbitnoff, using metal, drums, bells, aquasonic, daxophone, guzheng, vibes, bells, sax, clarinet and reeds in an intense journey that absorbs the listener and then draws them into a turbulent world of active sound, receding again at journey's end; amazing." 

       - Squidco


 On Intermetallic Compounds...
"As the layers begin to build, we enter into something like a grandfather clock factory run amok as sounds swirl together around a warped melody... PEK and company use every available tool to its maximum functionality on an extended aural improvisation that marries people and their tools. Intermetallic Compounds is mesmerizing and filled with an expectancy only for the next unexpected turn of events. This is living, breathing art in every sense of the word."
     - Karl Ackermann, allaboutjazz.com

​On Intermetallic Compounds... 
"The band name refers to the fact that each member plays metal percussion of some sort. The music unfolds slowly and mysteriously with the eerie sounds of bowed percussion, gongs, vibes, creating a hypnotic, floating world. The music here has a rather ritualistic, near-spiritual sound, which does occasionally erupt but never too much. At one point, there are some spooky vocal sounds which seem to push into some darker waters. Very effective. Overall, the music is quite like a ceremony, perhaps even wake up the dead from a deep slumber. Spirits rejoice! "
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG 

On Intermetallic Compounds...
"It’s a challenge to provide an accurate description of this ensemble. I will say that Intermetallic Compounds by the Metal Chaos Ensemble has to be one of the more interesting groups I have heard in a while. The way the musicians used their instruments, creates the illusion that the group is much larger than it really is....  The music is very much in the spirit of Sun Ra. There is so much going on from moment to moment. The musical landscape is always moving, changing, like watching multicolored neon lights while walking down Broadway in New York City. This music will be appreciated by those who love electronic music, exotic sounding instruments, noise-based music and fans of the avant-garde in general. This CD is highly recommended. Do try to catch the Metal Chaos Ensemble if they tour through a town near you."
​     - Marc Edwards, Jazz Right Now

On Hyperbolic Spirals...
"This set is from just three months ago and it is extraordinary. It is well recorded with some expensive gear and balanced just right. The music here has a ritualistic vibe which is often mesmerizing. The blend of several layers of percussion, metals bowed & banged, synth, vibes is like a dream unfolding. The Metal Chaos Ensemble may be one of the best unrecognized units to emerge in a while, they are certainly in top notch form here."  
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery

On War Tuba...
"War Tuba is a free improv world music spree unlike most anything I've heard. With the respective musicians' use of the aquasonic waterphone percussion instrument, jangling chains, metal objects, game calls, piccolo copper clarinet and other off the beaten path implements, the trio abides by a euphorically executed campaign. Think of ancient rituals with some degree of bombast, coinciding with PEK's various reeds and horns dialogues, enamored by the pristine audio characteristics." 
     - Glenn Astarita, All About Jazz

On Forgings...
"Everyone in this ensemble plays metal/percussion so we see a large number of gongs on display in the booklet. The eerie and occasionally disorienting sound of layers of metals & gongs slowly evolves throughout this disc. Eventually other instruments emerge from the chaos: synth, electronics, guitar, trumpet, assorted reeds and voice. There is a long stretch of more stark, suspense-filled improv midway that sounds just right." 
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Chrononauts...
"Beginning with spacious, mysterious sounds and building in intensity from there. ... The title here is "Chrononauts" which are time travelers and that seems appropriate for this unit which has that ancient to the future sort of sound plus a time machine-like image on the cover. The electronics and percussion work together here quite well and it is hard to tell them apart at times."
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Molten...
"It begins with multiple metals, gongs, cymbals, drums and assorted percussion. Quite hypnotic and well recorded. Similar in some ways to the Art Ensemble of Chicago, this music has otherworldly, ritualistic sort of sound." 
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Introducing... ...Sunshine!!... 
"This is one of the more low-key Metal Chaos sets but it does build into more intense, spirited sections. This disc is perhaps the only one from Metal Chaos that has a few more relaxed sections which show that this band is not always nightmarish as they seem." 
   - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 



Press On Chicxulub

On Creation Event
“'Impact' is a set-long single piece of some 67 minutes. Layers of resonating gongs, cymbals and assorted metals, near ominous in their dark, ritualistic sound. Is that an electric kazoo, are those sirens, gamelan gongs?!? It is quite unnerving yet somehow it does a fine job of transporting us to another world, weird yet exotic in its own way... Industrial music?!? Eventually, the throbbing beast calms down to a more hypnotic, ritualistic groove. There is a long section of somber percussion: glockenspiel, bells, glimmering cymbals or electronic reverberations?!?  Dinosaurs conversing? Godzilla vs. Gidra?!? PEK cuts loose on a large, deep sax in the second half, blasting with an immense, rather scary sound… but it doesn’t last for long as a more restrained, trance-inducing throb takes over, the beast calms down to a more tame segment. Is that a tribal, dance groove we hear towards the end?!?! It sure sounds that way and it sure feels good to me. Eventually settling into a long, coming in for a landing and a dream-like, space-music conclusion"
   - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 


Press on String Theory

On 3 of 9 Dimensions...
“… Things start our sparse and calm and build slowly towards more dense and heated passages. It sounds as if both string players were classically trained, hense this music has a controlled chamber-like quality. PEK often lays back to let the strings and piano fill up the sound so this doesn’t quite sound like other Leap of Faith offshoot sessions….  This is one the most laid back, yet still somehow enchanting of the many Leap of Faith offshoot projects.”
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 
  


On Thickness of the Present...
"... The sound of wheezing strings, expanding and contracting, groaning & droning reeds & double reeds, throbbing and spinning basses, hypnotic yet disorienting underwater currents flowing around us, reaching for the safety net. It you are patient, you will find yourself sailing on raft, balancing on the waters far at sea so sit down, listen close and enjoy the ride."
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery    


On Thickness of the Present...
"... The Leap of Faith string-heavy grouping in a concert at Outpost 186 in Cambridge, 2018 with PEK on bamboo saxophones, reeds, tarota, contrabassoon, sheng, melodica, aquasonic & bells; Glynis Lomon on cello & aquasonic; Grant Beale on guitar; Lukasz Pavlikovsky on cello & aquasonic; Albey onBass on electric bass; Silvain Castellano and Adrienne Schoenfeld on double bass."
     - Squidco Staff


On Angular Distortion...

"... this is a strong collective, group effort. Several subgroups emerge, submerge and interact in an organic, well-balanced way...   All in all, it does reveal a calmer center, yet is still like entering another world." 

     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery  


On Condensed Phases of Matter...
"String Theory sounds like a modern string quartet with PEK’s various reeds replacing the viola.... There are some especially magical sections where the three strings and double reed (oboe or bassoon) sound especially strong together, creating odd slight off-balance vibes, like drifting on a calm ocean which slowly becomes more turbulent as times goes on. PEK usually works on one of dozens of reeds at a time, concentrating on each one as he solos or interacts. Both cellos sound great when they deal with those deep, lower tones. This disc contains some of the best, most engaging strings and reeds quartet music I’ve heard. Most often quite mesmerizing." 
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery  


On Cosmological Constants... 
"The sound is often subdued, exploring string textures. Vocals are also minimal yet fit as a member of the quintet without ever taking over.  Ms. Lomon adds a bit of her own weird vocals yet again, they are used selectively like occasional sonic seasoning.  This disc sounds less ritualistic, less intense than most Leap of Faith sessions, yet it forces us to listen closer since things are not as explosive as usual. The flow of ideas seems slower yet there is some rich, thoughtful interaction as the work moves in waves, from calm to more agitated in parts."   
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery  
 
Press On Turbulence & Turbulence Doom Choir

On Flow Across Scales...  
“…In the first section, the horns all swirl together in a dream-like, somber way. Mr/ Zbitnov’s drums are central and keep things focused while the six horns swirl in and out of each others stream/flow. Things slowly get more dense as they unfold. The following section features a number of long, inspired solos for soprano sax, flute, trumpet(s), other reeds and/or double-reeds. Instead of going to a movie or a concert, Dave PEK does a fine job of gathering dozens of like-minded improvisers from the Boston area and organizing concerts and studio sessions, several times a month. And recording each and every one, as well as releasing every one as well. How does he maintain such a strong batting average? Well over 100 releases by now - early March of 2019. Another solid effort and with little or no vocal weirdness.”
      -  Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG   


 On Flow Across Scales...  
“…A larger than previous Boston collective's Turbulence ensemble with 6 of the regular horn players from Leap of Faith Orchestra, performing multi-reedist and instrumentalist PEK's extended framework, with drummer percussionist Yui Zbitnoff; the ensembe breaks down to three duos and guest saxophonist Bob O'Brien, captured live at Outpost 186, in Cambridge, MA in August 2018.”
      -  Squidco Staff


On Incompressible Flow...  
“… Things build slowly as the three horns play tentatively at first, calm and steady. What I find most intriguing is that has found a way to experiment with a variety of rare and not-so-rare reed instruments, hence there are a number of odd combinations: several double reeds like English horn contrabassoon & sheng along with various saxes and clarinets. The trio methodically pick one reed at a time and explore calmly, slowly. From the occasional Sun Ra Arkestra-like bent-note sax blasts to more thoughtful, calmly paced sections…  The balance of extremes is well chosen and selectively paced. Another choice disc from the deluge of Leap of Faith releases.”
      -  Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG 


On Energy Cascades... 

One of the Boston area's incredible, eclectic collective organizations from David PEK's Evil Clown is Turbulence Doom Choir, a quintet with three brass players, drums, reeds, and a variety of percussive, wind instruments, game calls, &c., presenting large scale improvisations of uniquely evolving approaches, instrumentation, and heavy rhythms, a powerful brew."

      -  Squidco


 On Energy Cascades... 

"The one or two tubas and trombone work well together, combining forces and complimenting each other. Although this quintet was a one-off, it sounds as if the unit has been working together for many years. Mr. Zbitnov helps navigate the rhythm currents underneath while PEK takes his time to find the right reed to add his consistently engaging solos. Yet another winner from the vast Evil Clown catalogue."

     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Lava Flow
“Turbulence” seems like a most appropriate title since this is what it feels like to be a raft on an ocean of crisscrossing currents. Both tubas are in the center creating layers of low-end drones with the disorienting blend of PEK’s shrewd reeds & double reeds and Zbitnov’s dizzying percussion… This is a strong spirited date, that is rarely too far out and sounds consistently spirited, engaging and filled with a central focus or magic. It is not that turbulent but still most well-conceived.
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Viscous Friction... 
"Although the instrumentation here is mainly reeds, brass and percussion, the results are still mysterious, strange, occasionally disorienting and often enchanting. It sounds as if time is being slowed down and we are submerged in a vat of jello at times. The music calms down to more skeletal, spacious sounds for a long stretch... There are some wonderful, strange, low-end improv going on featuring tuba, trumpet, contra-alto clarinet (?) and percussion. Things grow more weird when PEK switches some of those double-reeds like oboe or bassoon...  Once again Mr. PEK & Co. do a fine job of creating their own fascinating world.  Much less extreme than most of the Leap of Faith discs." 
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery

On Vortex Generation Mechanisms...
"It seamlessly moves across terrains that greatly vary in texture....  Vortex Generation Mechanisms veers between minimalism and an air-driven calliope coming off the rails. Despite employing a plethora of non-conventional tools, the music always has a sense of meaningfulness; it can be calming and disconnected at the same time. As a result, it is always more provoking than pacifying. Like much Evil Clown's output, this is a project that organically grows with each listening."
​   - Karl Ackermann, All About Jazz.com

Press On Mekaniks:


On The Great Klown Panik of 2016...
"This session begins with a scary, hoarse-voiced intro shouting about being a clown with equally disorienting music erupting under the voice: eerie cymbals, metal percussion, layers of disturbing voices, almost too much to deal with. In recent times, daily life has been filled with a series of bad news, alternative facts (or lies) and things too depressing to mention.This disc often captures that same spirit of not being sure if we are living in a someone’s nightmare or not. Sometimes, it feels good to whistle while we walk past the graveyard where the evil ghosts are lurking."
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


On Getting Down with the Klown...
"Commencing quietly with layers of mysterious percussion, cymbals, metal, balafon (African xylophone) and perhaps electronics, the sound is most mesmerizing. When PEK switches to tenor sax, the intensity level increases, an eruption of spirits takes place. When PEK picks up a double-reed (shenai?), things go even further out as spinning cymbals and bits of echoplex are added for seasoning…  This is like a soundtrack to science fiction movie which moves back and forth in time, from ancient villages to modern day free improv madness, all connected to an invisible thread. Alter your reality today!"
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


Press on PEK Solo


​​Reviews:

On Closed and Open Universes...  
"Evil Clown mastermind David Peck (PEK) in a double album of solo work, first solo acoustic, then in a long work accompanied by his own prepared mixes, using clarinets, saxophones, English horn, goat horn, tarota, bamboo, Chistmas & alto flutes, slide whistles, sheng, Melodica, Akai Wind controller, moog subsequent, gongs, brontosaurus & tank bells, Englephone, and delay."
- Squidco Staff


On Closed and Open Universes... 

"I found the sound of this disc (disc 1) to be a bit lonely, yet somehow enchanting. PEK takes his time to explore each instrument, carefully bending his notes one or two at times, the delay adding an eerie sense of mystery... For Disc 2…  PEK sounds great here, the production warm and not too weird. Instead of the usual dense Leap of Faith eruptions, PEK lays back, playing with a dream-like sound. Even his simmering melodica playing sounds a bit like Sun Ra, drifting from star to star. This is the most relaxed of all Evil Clown discs. The constant delay makes this more like a space trip… I was still knocked by the organic flow and space-age results.”  (full review below)
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG      


On Fulcrum...
“...The single hour and 20-minute piece is called "Leverage," and its narrative is as complex as the title is ambiguous. Instruments float past in a slow liquid procession of unfolding…  Peck has washed his vocabulary on each instrument clean of reference, so that the bass clarinet, just to cite an example, is about as far away from Eric Dolphy's classicalist or pointillist tendencies as can be desired…  Peck's approach is both melodic and not, just skirting any genre associations in favor of an approach at times nearly peaceful and at others whimsically raucous…”

- Marc Medwin, Squid's Ear


On Fulcrum...

“… It often seems as if PEK is stretching out time as he explores drones and textures slowly manipulating them, their sound expanding, contracting and carefully twisted. At one point Mr. Peck is playing bass sax, the deepest tone of the sax family.  It sounds as if we are being submerged in the depths of the sea, like being in a submarine or bathosphere…”  
- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery


On Thulsa Doom...

“’Scalar Invariant Curvatures’ opens with strange, ancient sounding, ritualistic sounds. Mr. Peck bathes his playing with some hypnotic echo or reverb. Hard to believe that we are listening to just one person, since things occasionally sound dense or disorienting. Reverberating gongs or metals, bizarre sounding double-reeds and electronics create another world, a planet where you never know what odd occurrence will take place but it seems somehow familiar. What this reminds me of at times are the Master Musicians of Bukkake, one of the weirdest musical groups from the Pacific Northwest, still in existence. Most impressive on many levels and occasionally disturbing.” 

     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG


Press On Raqib Hassan:

On Enlightenment...
"Mr. Hassan's music has a ... calm and spiritual center. ...The music reminds of one of those more laid back Pharaoh Sanders sessions from the late sixties but without any screaming saxes. ... Another swell, cosmic classic from the inspired crazies at Evil Clown enterprises."
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

On Another Plane...
"Right from the beginning, this music has a sublime, spiritual quality often found in the music of John Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders and Sun Ra. This is cosmic sounding free/jazz with layers of spiraling reeds, strings and percussion....  It sounds as if the band and audience are feeling the spirit and grooving together, traveling the spaceways. Eventually all of the horns, strings and drummers erupt into a powerful mass, so watch out as the heavens part. I dig the sound of those massed reeds & drums: flutes, saxes, double reeds & several drummers all swirling intensely around one another. Incredible!" 
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery  

Press On Equilibrium:

On Fitness Landscapes...
"I dig the way the trio take their time and improvise, quietly at first, slowly getting to know each other as they evolve together. At nearly 40 minutes long, it is like a long story unfolding, paced just right never too busy or too intense but always interesting." 
     - Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery 

- Bruce Lee Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery    

On Metal Chaos Ensemble: "... ​using unique strategies to yield densely active and eerily surreal music, an incredible excursion through experimental improvisation."   - Squidco website staff